Putting two things together that don’t go: Conflict

Hello Hello Hello

I had an epiphany, an aha. I was troubled and I looked at it. I saw that I was rushing, and I caught it. What was I really in a hurry for? The thought was, “I didn’t make enough money tonight to stay this long and close up.”  Ahh. Well that may be valid in valuing my time, but not my energy. Then I thought if I had made money would I still be rushing. Likely. I see that we put things together, justify and defend things in this way. Make something mean something. It’s a trap. So, I wanted to be done, but it’s up to me to have quantitative moments. That’s like saying, now it sucks, but it will be better. There’s no better out there. The better can only be now. There’s no tomorrow, if right now I can’t be right now. Tomorrow will be a log jam from here. Conflict.

I’m declaring,  ” I will not be manipulated to make something mean something!” Everyone’s personal insanity. Dig in deeply enough and you can find what you’ve put together that gives you strife.

My first repost ever..look at the date.. This is a life teaching

The Power of Visualization

by Administrator on April 1, 2009

The following Zen story illustrates third eye visioning in action. A master craftsman in ancient China was commissioned by the emperor to make a cabinet for the emperor’s bedroom in the Imperial Palace. The craftsman, a Zen monk, told the emperor he would not be able to begin work for five days. The monk was seen by the emperor’s spies simply sitting, apparently doing nothing for the entire time. Then, when five days had passed, the monk got up. Within three days, he had made the most extraordinary cabinet anyone had ever seen. The emperor was so pleased and so curious that he had the monk brought before him and asked what he had been doing the five days before he had begun his work. And this is what the monk said

  1. All the first day I spent releasing every thought of fear or failure, of dread of punishment if my work should displease the emperor.
  2. All the second day I spent releasing every thought of inadequacy and every belief that I might lack the skill to produce a cabinet worthy of the emperor.
  3. All the third day, I spent releasing every hope and desire for fame, glory and reward if I should produce a cabinet that would please the emperor
  4. All the fourth day, I spent releasing the pride that might arise in me if I should succeed in my task and earn the praise of the emperor.
  5. And all the fifth day, I spent beholding in the mind the clear vision of that cabinet which I knew even an emperor would desire, which now stands before you.

Let go of the shore.

Let go!

When I woke up this morning  my first thoughts were about being a river. I saw very clearly the things that keep me clinging to the shore.  Zen uses the river as an example of how to live a life in flow.  Whoever I am still carrying and wherever I perseverate is me clinging to the shore. We don’t have to stay on the shore. Comfort is also the shore.  That’s why Zen says stay moving. I see self inflicted torture as standing on the shore watching life go by, they are the thoughts that keep us from jumping in and letting nature deliver. When I got up and  I looked at new emails  there was one from my sister:

“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some
blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can.
Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it serenely and with too high a
spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Power of Visualization

The following Zen story illustrates third eye visioning in action. A master craftsman in ancient China was commissioned by the emperor to make a cabinet for the emperor’s bedroom in the Imperial Palace. The craftsman, a Zen monk, told the emperor he would not be able to begin work for five days. The monk was seen by the emperor’s spies simply sitting, apparently doing nothing for the entire time. Then, when five days had passed, the monk got up. Within three days, he had made the most extraordinary cabinet anyone had ever seen. The emperor was so pleased and so curious that he had the monk brought before him and asked what he had been doing the five days before he had begun his work. And this is what the monk said

  1. All the first day I spent releasing every thought of fear or failure, of dread of punishment if my work should displease the emperor.

  2. All the second day I spent releasing every thought of inadequacy and every belief that I might lack the skill to produce a cabinet worthy of the emperor.

  3. All the third day, I spent releasing every hope and desire for fame, glory and reward if I should produce a cabinet that would please the emperor

  4. All the fourth day, I spent releasing the pride that might arise in me if I should succeed in my task and earn the praise of the emperor.

  5. And all the fifth day, I spent beholding in the mind the clear vision of that cabinet which I knew even an emperor would desire, which now stands before you.